Pope Francis' New Exhortation
Amoris Laetitia
The Joy of Love
Download the Pope's teaching on joy, marriage, and the family:
Pope Francis' New Exhortation
Amoris Laetitia
The Joy of Love
Download the Pope's teaching on joy, marriage, and the family:
First Thoughts on Amoris Laetitia
Bishop Robert Barron
On a spring day about five years ago, when I was rector of Mundelein Seminary, Francis Cardinal George spoke to the assembled student body. He congratulated those proudly orthodox seminarians for their devotion to the dogmatic and moral truths proposed by the Church, but he also offered some pointed pastoral advice. He said that it is insufficient simply to drop the truth on people and then smugly walk away. Rather, he insisted, you must accompany those you have instructed, committing yourself to helping them integrate the truth that you have shared. I thought of this intervention by the late Cardinal often as I was reading Pope Francis’s apostolic exhortation Amoris Laetitia. If I might make bold to summarize a complex 264-page document, I would say that Pope Francis wants the truths regarding marriage, sexuality, and family to be unambiguously declared, but that he also wants the Church’s ministers to reach out in mercy and compassion to those who struggle to incarnate those truths in their lives. 

In regard to the moral objectivities of marriage, the Pope is bracingly clear. He unhesitatingly puts forward the Church’s understanding that authentic marriage is between a man and a woman, who have committed themselves to one another in permanent fidelity, expressing their mutual love and openness to children, and abiding as a sacrament of Christ’s love for his Church (52, 71). He bemoans any number of threats to this ideal, including moral relativism, a pervasive cultural narcissism, the ideology of self-invention, pornography, the “throwaway” society, etc. He explicitly calls to our attention the teaching of Pope Paul VI in Humanae Vitae regarding the essential connection between the unitive and the procreative dimensions of conjugal love (80). Moreover, he approvingly cites the consensus of the recent Synod on the Family that homosexual relationships cannot be considered even vaguely analogous to what the Church means by marriage (251). He is especially strong in his condemnation of ideologies that dictate that gender is merely a social construct and can be changed or manipulated according to our choice (56). Such moves are tantamount, he argues, to forgetting the right relationship between creature and Creator. Finally, any doubt regarding the Pope’s attitude toward the permanence of marriage is dispelled as clearly and directly as possible: “The indissolubility of marriage—‘what God has joined together, let no man put asunder’ (Mt 19:6) —should not be viewed as a ‘yoke’ imposed on humanity, but as a ‘gift’ granted to those who are joined in marriage...” (62).

In a particularly affecting section of the exhortation, Pope Francis interprets the famous hymn to love in Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians (90-119). Following the great missionary Apostle, he argues that love is not primarily a feeling (94), but rather a commitment of the will to do some pretty definite and challenging things: to be patient, to bear with one another, to put away envy and rivalry, ceaselessly to hope. In the tones of grandfatherly pastor, Francis instructs couples entering into marriage that love, in this dense and demanding sense of the term, must be at the heart of their relationship. I frankly think that this portion of Amoris Laetitia should be required reading for those in pre-Cana other similar marriage preparation programs in the Catholic Church. Now Francis says much more regarding the beauty and integrity of marriage, but you get my point: there is no watering down or compromising of the ideal in this text. 

However, the Pope also honestly admits that many, many people fall short of the ideal, failing fully to integrate all of the dimensions of what the Church means by matrimony. What is the proper attitude to them? Like Cardinal George, the Pope has a visceral reaction against a strategy of simple condemnation, for the Church, he says, is a field hospital, designed to care precisely for the wounded (292). Accordingly, he recommends two fundamental moves. First, we can recognize, even in irregular or objectively imperfect unions, certain positive elements that participate, as it were, in the fullness of married love. Thus for example, a couple living together without benefit of marriage might be marked by mutual fidelity, deep love, the presence of children, etc. Appealing to these positive marks, the Church might, according to a “law of gradualness,” move that couple toward authentic and fully-integrated matrimony (295). This is not to say that living together is permitted or in accord with the will of God; it is to say that the Church can perhaps find a more winsome way to move people in such a situation to conversion.

The second move—and here we come to what will undoubtedly be the most controverted part of the exhortation—is to employ the Church’s classical distinction between the objective quality of a moral act and the subjective responsibility that the moral agent bears for committing that act (302). The Pope observes that many people in civil marriages following upon a divorce find themselves in a nearly impossible bind. If their second marriage has proven faithful, life-giving, and fruitful, how can they simply walk out on it without in fact incurring more sin and producing more sadness? This is, of course, not to insinuate that their second marriage is not objectively disordered, but it is to say that the pressures, difficulties, and dilemmas might mitigate their culpability. Here is how Pope Francis applies the distinction: “Hence it is can no longer simply be said that all those in any ‘irregular’ situation are living in a state of mortal sin and are deprived of sanctifying grace” (301). Could the Church’s minister, therefore, not help such people, in the privacy of the rectory parlor or the confessional, to discern their degree of moral responsibility? Once again, this is not to embrace a breezy “anything-goes” mentality, nor to deny that a civil marriage after a divorce is objectively irregular; it is to find, perhaps, for someone in great pain, a way forward. 

Will Amoris Laetitia end all debate on these matters? Hardly. But it does indeed represent a deft and impressive balancing of the many and often contradictory interventions at the two Synods on the Family. As such, it will be of great service to many suffering souls who come to the Field Hospital.
Primeras reflexiones sobre Amoris Laetitia
Bishop Robert Barron
Un día de primavera hace alrededor de cinco años, cuando era rector del Seminario de Mundelein, el Cardenal Francis George habló al cuerpo de estudiantes reunido. Felicitó a aquellos seminaristas fieles por su devoción a las verdades dogmáticas y morales propuestas por la Iglesia, pero también les brindó unos punzantes consejos pastorales. Les dijo que es simplemente insuficiente comentar la verdad a la gente y después marcharse con arrogancia. Más bien, les insistió, deben acompañar a aquellos a quienes han instruido, comprometiéndose en su ayuda a incorporar las verdades que les han compartido. Pensé frecuentemente en esta intervención del fallecido Cardenal mientras iba leyendo la exhortación apostólica Amoris Laetitia del Papa Francisco. Si pudiera tomarme el atrevimiento de resumir este complejo documento de 264 páginas, diría que el Papa Francisco quiere que las verdades referidas al matrimonio, la sexualidad y la familia se anuncien sin ambigüedades, pero también quiere que los ministros de la Iglesia lleguen con misericordia y compasión a aquellos que batallan por encarnar esas verdades en sus vidas.

En relación a la objetividad moral del matrimonio, el Papa es vigorizantemente claro. Postula sin titubeos la opinión de la Iglesia que el matrimonio auténtico es entre un hombre y una mujer, quienes se han comprometido el uno al otro en fidelidad eterna, expresando su amor mutuo y abierto a los hijos, y perdurable como un sacramento del amor de Cristo por su Iglesia (52, 71). Se lamenta de varias amenazas a este ideal, incluyendo el relativismo moral, un narcisismo cultural generalizado, la ideología de la auto-invención, la pornografía, la sociedad del “descarte”, etc. Nos señala explícitamente la enseñanza del Papa Pablo VI en Humanae Vitae en referencia a la conexión esencial entre las dimensiones unitivas y procreativas del amor conyugal (80). Aún más, cita con aprobación el consenso del reciente Sínodo de la Familia sobre que las relaciones homosexuales no pueden considerarse, ni aun remotamente, comparables a lo que la Iglesia llama matrimonio (251). Es especialmente firme en su condena a las ideologías que sostienen que el género es meramente una construcción social y puede cambiarse o manipularse de acuerdo a nuestro deseo (56). Esos movimientos son equivalentes, razona, a olvidar la correcta relación entre creatura y Creador. Finalmente, cualquier duda referida a la actitud del Papa hacia la estabilidad del matrimonio es disipada tan clara y directamente como es posible: “La indisolubilidad del matrimonio —‘lo que Dios ha unido, que no lo separe el hombre’ (Mt19, 6) — no hay que entenderla ante todo como un ‘yugo’ impuesto a los hombres sino como un ‘don’ hecho a las personas unidas en matrimonio…” (62).

En una sección particularmente emotiva de la exhortación, el papa Francisco interpreta el famoso himno del amor de la primera carta de Pablo a los Corintios (90-119). Siguiendo al gran Apóstol misionero, argumenta que el amor no es primariamente un sentimiento (94), sino más bien un compromiso de la voluntad de realizar algunas cosas muy concretas y desafiantes: ser pacientes, soportarse uno con el otro, dejar de lado la envidia y la rivalidad, esperar incesantemente. Con el tono de un pastor paternal, Francisco instruye a las parejas que se inician en el matrimonio que el amor, en el complejo y exigente sentido de la palabra, debe estar en el corazón de su relación. Francamente pienso que esta parte de Amoris Laetitia debería ser de lectura obligatoria para aquellos que están en los cursos pre-matrimoniales en la Iglesia Católica. Aquí Francisco dice mucho sobre la belleza y la integridad del matrimonio, pero entienden a lo que apunto: en este texto no suaviza ni compromete el ideal.

Sin embargo, el Papa también admite que mucha, mucha gente está por debajo de este ideal, fallando completamente al incorporar todas las dimensiones de lo que la Iglesia entiende por matrimonio. ¿Cuál es la correcta actitud hacia ellos? Como el Cardenal George, el Papa tiene una reacción visceral en contra de la simple estrategia de condenación, ya que la Iglesia, dice, es un hospital de campaña, concebido para cuidar precisamente a los heridos (292). Por consiguiente recomienda dos pasos fundamentales. Primero, podemos reconocer, aún en uniones irregulares u objetivamente imperfectas, ciertos elementos positivos que participan, por así decirlo, de la plenitud del amor matrimonial. Así por ejemplo, una pareja que vive junta sin el beneficio del matrimonio podría ser calificada por su fidelidad mutua, amor profundo, la presencia de niños, etc. Apelando a estas señales positivas, la Iglesia podría, de acuerdo con la “ley de la gradualidad”, acercar a esa pareja a un matrimonio auténtico y completamente íntegro (295). Esto no es lo mismo que decir que vivir juntos está permitido o de acuerdo con la voluntad de Dios; quiere decir que la Iglesia puede tal vez encontrar una forma más atractiva de acercar a la gente a una situación de conversión. 

El segundo paso –y aquí llegamos a lo que sin dudas será la parte más controvertida de la exhortación- es emplear la clásica distinción de la Iglesia entre la calidad objetiva del acto moral y la responsabilidad subjetiva que el sujeto moral asume por cometer aquel acto (302). El Papa observa que mucha gente casada por la ley civil luego de un divorcio se encuentra a sí misma prácticamente entre la espada y la pared. Si su segundo matrimonio ha resultado fiel, vivificante y fructífero, ¿cómo podrían abandonarlo sin de hecho incurrir en más pecado y produciendo más tristeza? Esto no es, por supuesto, insinuar que su segundo matrimonio no es objetivamente desordenado, pero sí es decir que las presiones, dificultades y dilemas podrían mitigar su culpabilidad. Aquí es donde el Papa aplica la distinción: “Por eso, ya no es posible decir que todos los que se encuentran en alguna situación así llamada «irregular» viven en una situación de pecado mortal, privados de la gracia santificante.” (301) ¿Podría entonces el ministro de la Iglesia, dejar de ayudar a esta gente, en la privacidad de un salón parroquial o en el confesionario, a discernir el grado de su responsabilidad moral? Nuevamente, esto no significa aceptar una mentalidad despreocupada del “todo vale”, ni negar que un matrimonio civil después de un divorcio es objetivamente irregular; significa encontrar, para alguien que sufre mucho, tal vez, un camino a seguir.

¿Terminará con Amoris Laetitia el debate sobre estos temas? Difícilmente. Pero sí representa un balance hábil e impactante de las muchas, y a menudo contradictorias, intervenciones en los dos Sínodos de la Familia. De esta manera, prestará un gran servicio a muchas almas sufrientes que se acercan al Hospital de Campaña.
BISHOP BARRON VIDEO
Watch Bishop Barron's reflections on the Pope's new exhortation
SOCIAL MEDIA GRAPHICS
Click to enlarge, right-click to download and share on social media